Author Archives: Kui Xie

Publication on Teacher Competency in Digital Content Evaluation

Kim, M.K., Xie, K., & Cheng. S.L. (2017). Building teacher competency for digital content evaluation. Teaching and Teacher Education, 66, 309-324. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2017.05.006

Abstract
The purpose of the current study is to investigate teachers’ digital content evaluation (DCE) competency as a combined set of teachers’ intellectual ability and affect-motivation in evaluating digital content. To this end, this study employed an exploratory sequential mixed-methods design to examine 102 in-service teachers’ experiences in a one-year DCE professional development program. Qualitative thematic analysis followed by quantitative K-means cluster analysis identified and validated four levels of teacher competency in DCE: familiarization, utilization, integration, and reorientation. In addition, this study also proposed design guidelines to scaffold DCE competency development tailored to the needs of teachers at various competency levels.

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Xie Receives 2017 EHE Distinguished Research Award

Dr. Kui Xie, our lab director, receives the 2017 EHE Distinguished Research Award. The EHE Distinguished Research Award honors one individual every year who advances the field through transforming and integrating knowledge, facilitating learning, solving compelling problems, contributing to public policy, evaluating practices and programs, or interpreting knowledge for relevant audiences. (more…)

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Publication on Conflictual Presence and Identity

Xie, K., Lu, L., Cheng. S.L., & Izmirli, S. (2017). The interactions between facilitator identity, conflictual presence, and social presence in peer-moderated online collaborative learning. Distance Education. doi:10.1080/01587919.2017.1322458

Abstract
Research has focused on the significance of social presence in online learning. However, peer interaction does not always result in positive emotions and feelings; it can trigger tension, distress, and anger within a learning community. Therefore, conflictual presence, as a carrier of negative valence within presence, is also a critical element when it becomes inimical to online discussions. Drawing upon the socially situated identity theory and using discourse analysis, this study presents an authentic case where conflictual presence, social presence, and identity negotiation were intertwined throughout the entire life of an online learning community. Findings reveal that students craft their discourses to fashion themselves as a certain kind of facilitator and participant. Implicit and explicit identity negotiation is ubiquitous in discursive interactions and can lead to tension and conflictual socio-relations at times.

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Publication on Teacher Professional Development

Xie, K., Kim, M.K., Cheng. S.L., & Luthy, N.C. (2017). Digital Content Evaluation as Technology Professional Development. Educational Technology Research and Development. doi:10.1007/s11423-017-9519-0

Abstract
In this study, researchers designed and implemented a 1-year professional development (PD) program that focused on supporting teachers in evaluating and selecting digital learning contents. Participants in this investigation included 109 teachers who consented to the study amongst a total of 171 teachers from five school districts across central Ohio. In addition to their participation in the PD program, they completed surveys, interviews, and self-reflections in this mixed-method study. The results revealed that teachers’ perceived TPACK increased over time throughout the PD program, suggesting that training teachers to evaluate digital contents can be an effective PD model to improve teachers’ capacity in learning technology integration. The PD program was especially effective for teachers with less prior experience in technology integration or related training. Mathematics teachers, in comparison to teachers from other disciplines, began with low TPACK; however, these initial differences gradually diminished over the course of the PD program. In terms of their motivation in digital content evaluation, teachers’ expectancy for success increased significantly while their task values remained medium high. The qualitative analyses provided additional insights and revealed design suggestions for success in future PDs.

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Algebra Ready to Improve Teacher Quality

We are thrilled to announce that our latest project, Algebra Ready: Teaching Mathematics with Digital Content, has received funding support from Ohio Department of Higher Education. The project builds upon the success of our previous EDCITE: Evaluating Digital Content for Instructional and Teaching Excellence project and has design features tailored to address the specific needs in algebra teaching.

Algebra Ready aims to improve teachers’ mathematical content knowledge and pedagogical strategies, their technological pedagogical knowledge for adopting digital resources in teaching mathematics and, ultimately, to increase students’ academic achievement and college readiness in the area of mathematics. The project focuses on algebra across grade levels and the contents are well aligned with Ohio’s New Learning Standards. (more…)

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