Lab Members Present at AERA 2016 at Washington, DC.


In the upcoming 2016 Annual Meeting for American Educational Research Association (AERA) at Washington, DC, our lab members will be involved in four paper sessions:

1.How Teachers Learn and Become Competent via the Evaluation of Digital Materials

Xie, K., Cheng, S.L., Kim, M., & Luthy, N.C. (2016, April). How teachers learn and become competent via the evaluation of digital materials, Paper to be presented the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Washington, DC.

In Event: Supporting Technology Integration Through Professional Development
Sun, April 10, 10:35am to 12:05pm, Marriott Marquis, Level Two, Marquis Salon 13

Abstract
In this study we designed and implemented a one-year professional development program that focused on evaluating digital content. 171 teachers from 5 schools districts across central Ohio participated in this study. The results revealed that teachers’ TPACK and self-efficacy increased across time during the PD program, suggesting that training teachers on evaluating digital content can be an innovative and effective PD model to improve teachers’ TPACK as well as their self-efficacy. This training model was especially effective for teachers with less prior experience in technology integration or related training. However, teachers’ motivation deceased over time. Qualitative analyses revealed requirements needed for successful PD.

2. Technology Professional Development on Catalyst Teachers Through a Blended Approach

Xie, K., Lu, L., Cheng, S.L., & Kim, M. (2016, April). Technology Professional Development on Catalyst Teachers through A Blended Approach, Paper to be presented the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Washington, DC.

In Event: Teacher Knowledge and Technology Professional Development
Tue, April 12, 10:35am to 12:05pm, Marriott Marquis, Level Four, Treasury

Abstract
This mixed-method study investigated teachers’ experience in a one-year technology professional development program with foci on TPACK, blended learning, and a community of catalyst teachers. The findings suggest that this model of technology professional development were effective to improve teachers’ TPACK and maintain their motivation for technology integration. The blended approach provided a flexible, accessible, situated and self-paced PD experience for teachers. A community of catalyst teachers was formed. The sense of community, collaborations, and leadership identity were especially meaningful components of teachers’ experience in this PD program.

3. A Study on the Teacher Competency Building for Digital Content Evaluation

Kim, M., Cheng, S.L., Xie, K., Priebe, D., & Chen, S.B. (2016, April). A study on the teacher competency building for digital content evaluation. Paper to be presented the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Washington, DC.

In Event: Roundtable Session 11
In Roundtable Session: Evaluation of Teacher Professional Development
Fri, April 8, 4:05 to 5:35pm, Convention Center, Level Two, Exhibit Hall D Section A

Abstract
This mixed-method study examines 171 in-service teachers’ experiences in the one-year digital content evaluation professional development program. The program was funded by Ohio Department of Education. Specifically, the study investigates the teachers’ perceived values of digital content evaluation and the way in which they develop evaluation competency and leadership knowledge and skills. Finding of the study indicated that (a) evaluation competency is apparently a cognitively demanding task; (b) the development of evaluation competency likely proceeds through qualitatively distinctive stages; and (c) leadership building takes a long-term process and is often constrained by school culture. To provide better PD services, this study also suggested design strategies identified from the review of the teacher interviews.

4. Affordances of Using Mobile Technology to Support Experience-Sampling Method in Examining College Students’ Learning Habits

Xie, K., Greene, B., Heddy, B. C., Chen, S.B. (2016, April). The Affordances of Using Mobile Technology to Support Experience-Sampling Method in Examining College Students’ Learning Habits. Paper to be presented the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Washington, DC.

In Event: Affordances and Uses of Open Educational Resources and Mobile Technologies
Sat, April 9, 12:25 to 1:55pm, Marriott Marquis, Level Two, Marquis Salon 13

Abstract
In this study, we investigated how mobile technology could support experience-sampling method in examining college students’ learning habits. We first compared students’ retrospective responses with “in-the-moment” responses. We found that the data presented similar patterns but differ in details. We then compared fixed sampling with event-based sampling methods. We found that the latter method improved sampling accuracy, reduced extraneous prompts, and reduced missing data. In addition, we examined college students’ study time and locations and identified patterns in relation to students’ self-regulation of learning as well as their in-the-moment emotions. The findings have implications for guiding design and intervention to better support students’ learning.

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